Six spooky ICD-10 codes

The implementation of ICD-10 is giving nightmares to everyone that is concerned, for all the right reasons. From using a set of some 17,000 codes in ICD-9, the industry is moving up to a standard of over 140,000 codes with ICD-10. With the deadline of implementing the new system less than a year away, it is only logical that the doctors and healthcare support staff are going to require a lot of training in getting used to the new set of codes.

 

Some of them, though, are easy to remember for all the spooky characteristics they have. Let’s take a look at them.

  1. Vampire bite: S11.95X: Open bite of unspecified part of the neck, initial encounter. If you believe in existence of vampires, and accidently get bit by one of them, this ICD-10 code is going to come into play.
  2. What happens to the vampire at dawn: X32.xxxA, exposure to sunlight. If you spend too much time under the sun trying to get some vitamin D or a nice tan and get too much exposure, this ICD-10 code is going to make a mark on your chart.
  3. Encounter with a black cat: A281, cat scratch fever. Not necessarily just black cats, but if you get scratches from any cat, this code will be used by your practitioner.
  4. Poison from witch’s brew: T65.9, toxic effect of unspecified substance. Any substance, if used in a lot of amount, is going to have some effects on you. If the effects are toxic, then this T65.9 will apply to you.
  5. Zombies: Z72.820, sleep deprivation. Any sort of sleep deprivation, whether you stay out late trick or treating, is going to get you classified as a Zombie in ICD-10.
  6. Encounter with creepy crawlers: X21, contact with venomous spiders. This ICD-10 code will be easy to remember if you concentrate on its symbol which pretty much looks like a four-legged spider in itself.

These 6 interesting ICD-10 codes certainly make it that much more easy to remember them. Let’s hope you are able to learn the rest of them.

ICD 10 5 steps to take now

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One Response to Six spooky ICD-10 codes

  1. Pingback: How does EHR help improve workflow | EMR Blog

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