The Successful Electronic Health Records Implementation

The Successful Electronic Health Records Implementation

Finding the right partner

Use services like KLAS to find top-rated vendors.

Is the EHR certified?

Does the EHR adapt to my workflow?

Will the new solution fit my budget?

Planning the implementation

Use a detailed project plan that lays out tasks and milestones clearly.

Leverage your partner’s expertise to bridge the gap between your current state and best

Practice. Read more

5 EHR Infographics that every provider must read

EHRs are an important element of the healthcare market. It is vital to realize the importance of EHRs and the direction the entire industry is headed in. With the help of info-graphics it is easier to show marketing trends, the following article will show you some of the best info-graphics relating to healthcare, ranging from subjects like; when to get a new EHR? What share do different vendors in the market hold? Does technology really improve the way a practice is run? Find out with below amongst many other important subjects.

1) Electronic Health Records Infographic

How do electronic health records (EHRs) connect you and your doctor? In the past, medical data was only stored on paper, making it difficult for your health care providers to share your information. Read more


2) The 20 Most Popular EHR Software Solutions

As the deadline for implementation in the U.S. draws near, talk of electronic medical records (EMR) and electronic health records (EHR) software is a hot topic at the doctor’s office lately. These systems assist medical practitioners in the creation, storage, and organization of electronic medical records, including patient charts, electronic prescriptions, lab orders, and evaluations (just to name a few common features).  Read more


3) Why are EHR users replacing EHR SOFTWARE?

 This infographic created for Honeywell depicts the top reasons why hospitals and medical practices are replacing their EHR software. See more


4) 11 indicators that you need a new EHR

Often so deeply immersed in looking for ways to make their practice more efficient, physicians sometimes fail to see the most obvious hurdle preventing this very process from occurring; their EHR. If your Electronic Health Record (EHR) solution is not up to the mark, you might be losing out on precious profits, and incurring costs that you can easily overcome. Read more


5) The Convergence of Big Data and EHR Infographic

“In the next 10 years, data science and software will do more for medicine than all of the biological sciences together,” said venture capitalist Vinod Khosla. Data science holds great promise for patient health, but patient data is only actionable in so far as it is digital. Read more


Why EHR customer satisfaction is the highest among big groups?

The health IT market is flooded with government certified EHRs to meet the Meaningful Use program. The task is to find out the right medical vendor that fulfills practice requirements. This is particularly difficult for small to medium practices, as it appears vendors pay more attention to providing flawless services to large practices. According to Black Book Rankings 2014 Survey, practices having 25 or more physicians are more satisfied with vendor customer support than practices catering to small/medium groups.(2-5, 6-25). Among the respondents, 90.2% of physicians from large practices reported satisfaction with their vendors as compared to 72.5% of physicians from small or medium sized practices.

One of the major reasons is the vendor resources that do not allow them to give proper attention to small practices. Health IT is a competitive market where large practices and hospitals are major buyers of technology. They drive the health IT market by creating technology demand for huge infrastructures. With sufficient financial backup to implement an EHR system, they partner with vendors for a long period. Similarly, vendors prefer to utilize their limited resources on big projects that promise maximum revenue. By doing so, they usually miss the opportunity to create loyal customers among small practices and provide most of their customer support to physicians in large practices, as highlighted by the Black Book Rankings 2014

Another reason for dissatisfaction among small practices is related to their efforts in vendor search and implementation of EHR. It’s fair to suggest that part of the blame is on the physicians with small practices. Instead of conducting a thorough research of the market, they rush into buying the first EHR they come across [EHR buyer tips]. On the contrary, large practices take their time in understanding the market, the products they offer, strengths and reputation of vendors and demands of their practice before selecting the right vendor. For them, it’s a business partnership that can only work when the vendor fulfills its side of bargain with impeccable technology and customer support.

However, one cannot blame small practices entirely for lack of customer support on the vendor’s part. Ideally, it’s the vendor’s responsibility to provide customer support during the implementation and post implementation phase of EHR. Before signing a contract with a new practice, vendors should make analysis of their available resources and capabilities, so that the customer does not have to suffer in the long run.

Meaningful Use criteria for Eligible Professionals (EPs)

In order to avail government incentives for Meaningful Use program, eligible professionals (EPs) would have to demonstrate that they have been using their electronic health records (EHRs) according to the criteria of meaningful use program. Physicians would have to successfully attest to the program in order to qualify for government incentives program, administered by Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

EPs who have just adopted EHRs would not have to attest for meaningful use program in their first year of implementation, but without later attestation they won’t be eligible for government incentives.

Meaningful Use criteria

The first criterion to fulfill in order to achieve meaningful use is to adopt a government certified EHR system. The certified software should be interoperable and have ICD-10 coding system. The software should have a patient portal to engage patients for informed and improved healthcare. This is required under the Medicare EHR Incentive Programs, which is run under by the CMS.

The objectives and criteria for the meaningful use program have been divided into three different stages that will span over five years period. The objectives are further divided into core and menu, of which core objectives should be fulfilled. However, there is option for EPs to meet any criteria in the menu set.

In meaningful use stage 1, EPs should have certified EHRs, use it to record clinical and non-clinical data of patients, share information with necessary stakeholders and patients. The meaningful use stage 2  [whitepaper] requires EPs to be more rigorous about health information data, while the third stage focuses on the efficiency and quality of data shared and improved patient care.

Is BYOD going to improve coordinated care?

Bring your own device (BYOD) is going to revolutionize the way technology is looked upon, but what is BYOD? It refers to rules and procedures set by the practice allowing employees to use their personal mobile gadgets to access company data. It can improve coordinated care because it reflects future of the healthcare industry.


Mobile devices are becoming common by every passing day. Mobile revolution is by all means is here and roaring. Practices’ use of smartphones and other gadgets is a common practice now.

A recent global survey conducted by PEW research of companies all around the world found that 28% of their workforce uses personal devices for work related tasks. The research further stated that this percentage is expected to rise to 35% in 2013. In general as of May 2013, 91% of American adults have a cell phone, 56% of American adults have a smartphone. This boils down to the fact that technological gadgets are extremely common, and using them in a work environment can not only be useful, but may very well generate a new market for employees in a work environment.

It can improve coordinated care because providers, nurses, healthcare staff and patients are generally more comfortable with their own devices as they have more control over it. Think of it like this, if a provider uses a mobile EHR device on his own smartphone, isn’t it convenient? It is way more efficient since he can take his device anywhere he likes and keep his practice in check.

BYOD can increase patient safety and reduce the risk of medical errors. Personal devices can patch the critical communication gaps and allow for easy access of clinical information at the point of care with other clinicians for coordinating care of the patient.

To provide security for all personal gadgets of the employees can become a huge challenge for the IT department of the healthcare facility but at the end of the day, standardization is also an issue. But look at this way, new rules, regulations and structures that are being formed will pave the way for innovation. It will provide coordinated care to their patients by allowing wide and convenient access to the patients. Apart from that, the sooner the challenges met in terms of diverse use of mobile devices the better it is, because in the future more and more unique personal devices will be produced.

Personal devices do not need to be set up in a certain way to function, instead the devices allows limited functionality. Downloading healthcare mobile EHR app from the store or accessing company’s email from your email browser doesn’t require using company services that are set up in a restrictive way. It essentially saves the setup cost.

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