mHealth: The Way Forward

The rate of development in the mobile technology industry is unparalleled and it is now making headway in the field of health IT. The recent influx of medical professionals adopting the latest sophisticated tools to enhance care delivery and engage patients has meant that consumers now expect technology to simplify everything.

Healthcare providers are not the only ones looking to accept these technological advances, as their patients are demanding mobile applications to monitor their own health. Mobile health or commonly known as mHealth refers to the practice of medicine, public health surveillance and patient engagement through mobile devices such as tablets, phones etc. This can provide a means for care givers and patients to access clinical records from anywhere, patients able to request prescription refills or appointments and most importantly the ability for patients to monitor their health constantly and from anywhere in the world.

In a recent hearing launched by the Subcommittee on Communications and Technology, Jonathan Spalter, chairman of Mobile Future, an organization that represents innovators across the wireless community said, “Nowhere is that promise of future innovation and opportunity greater than mobile health. Our message today is that the innovation and vision exist now in both the medical and technology communities working together collaboratively. This progress will proceed, in many respects, as rapidly as government allows.”

The mobile health market is expected to reach around $26 billion by 2017. According to a recent report, there are close to 100,000 mobile health applications and more in development by well known health IT vendors. Not only are there a number of mobile phone applications for patients but there are many in the making for healthcare professionals.

The Manhattan Research Survey estimates that in 2012 there were approximately 75 million users of Mobile Health or mHealth, who not only searched for health related issues on their mobile phones through popular search engines, but also actively used mobile phone applications to monitor and improve their health. In the same report, it was stated that almost half of the older population (55 plus) were using mobile devices to search for health related issues.

Electronic Medical Records or EMRs were originally built to be run on devices which were platform specific. This has changed with the rapid development and commercial use of technological innovations. Web-based EMRs have now allowed doctors to be truly mobile and can run on any platform or device; whether it be a computer a standard office computer, a laptop, tablet or a Smartphone. Although the demand for mobile-health solutions is increasing, some in the healthcare community remain skeptical about the implementation of such solutions.

David Levy, MD, global healthcare leader, PwC says, “Despite demand and the obvious potential benefits of mHealth, rapid adoption is not yet occurring. The main barriers are not the technology but rather systemic to healthcare and inherent resistance to change. Though many people think mobile health will be ancillary or bolted on to the healthcare industry, we look at it differently: mHealth is the future of healthcare, deeply integrated into delivery that will be better, faster, less expensive and far more customer-focused.”

There are always obstacles for any potential technology to fully integrate with and possibly overtake current technological systems, but there is no denying that mHealth is the way forward for the healthcare industry. A recent study undertaken by PwC shows that a majority of consumers predict that in the next three years, mHealth will vastly improve the quality, cost and convenience of the entire care delivery process.

 

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