EMR Adoption and Health Information Exchange

The last few years have been monumental for health. Electronic medical records have flooded into the mainstream with a recent report from Center for Disease Control (CDC) suggesting that nearly 55% of physicians in the US are at some stage of adoption. The survey also indicated that most respondents felt that EMRs had improved the overall quality of care. Industry analysts view this as a huge achievement for the healthcare industry and a giant leap towards the reformation process. One industry expert says, “The EMR has the numbers now. With more than half of the physician populous already using electronic medical records, physicians still using paper will have to join in or risk becoming obsolete.”

The U.S has been quick to utilize emerging technology in healthcare and with EMR adoption on the rise, physicians are likely to respond positively to innovation. “Our objective is connecting care and to reach this goal, we require an electronic health information exchange platform. EMRs provide just that”, says a hospital administrator.

John Lynn from healthcarescene.com shared a similar opinion in his blog. He believes that most of the healthcare community is aware of the benefits of Health Information Exchange (HIE). John argues that while standardization and development costs are two main barriers, the scale of EMR adoption in the country may be the biggest impediment to growth in the sector, he writes, “We want HIE’s to be successful, but can an HIE be really successful for doctors and hospitals that don’t have an EHR? The lack of EHR adoption might be the biggest impediment to HIE.”

The transformation of the healthcare system hinges on the success of electronic medical records. Having realized the importance of EMR adoption, the government extended its support through Regional Extension Centers and other educational communities in various states. The ONC highlighted the need for outreach programs targeting the rural and underdeveloped areas. While cost is a major deterrent here, education and exposure are the other key constraints.

The CDC survey also listed solo providers as the laggards in the adoption cycle, with only 30% reporting for adoption. However, the outlook is not so bleak. An industry expert highlighted that it’s common for independent businesses to lag behind in industrial changes, saying, “The adoption may be slower for independent doctor offices but it would change in the long run. Physicians are likely to follow large health corporations and hospitals in adoption. In fact there is an increasing trend of independent doctors adopting EMR systems with an HIE interface with their local hospital.”

HIEs are a step in the right direction and should help reduce cost in the long run. The communication process will simplify and health organizations will be able improve the patient care process through coordination. EMR adoption will continue to be the top priority and the government remains optimistic as it aims to shift America to electronic medical records by the end of 2014.

Read more: Data migration: Why is it important in Healthcare?

 

About Frank Quinn

Over the past twenty years, Frank Quinn has contributed significantly on standardizing, interconnecting and institutionalizing care delivery through health IT, helping eliminate barriers to accessibility, quality and adoption. EMR, practice management, eRx, patient portal, medical billing, compliance, privacy and security are his areas of expertise. For more information, please contact Frank at frank.quinn@curemd.com
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