EMR Interoperability and Accountable Care Organizations

Ever since the public release of the proposed rules for Meaningful Use stage 2, concerns regarding EMR capability to share and expedite medical information and workflow across multiple health organizations and platforms have been mounting consistently. The concept of an Accountable Care Organization is to provide efficient, effective and affordable healthcare. By creating a platform for sharing information across multiple health organizations the healthcare community can enhance medical response time and care delivery.

While ACOs are slowly emerging in forms of large hospital alliances dedicated to change through technology utilization, smaller practices with scarce resources are increasingly becoming endangered. Large medical groups are progressively developing integrated health networks by deploying resources to create sustainable technology that enables clinical collaboration.

Small organizations simply cannot afford to dedicate the time and resources necessary in developing such technology and hence most are dependent on their EHR vendor to provide a linkup to the HIE. However this does not work for everyone and although HIE development has significantly improved over the years, connectivity is still limited at best.

While many choose to blame EMR, issues like data security and information exchange protocols are seldom acknowledged. Communication and clinical information sharing are two of the most important questions in the healthcare community at the moment. However once the technology does break through, the situation is likely to change. What would happen when ACO partner organizations effectively start sharing confidential clinical data? Information is likely to pass through several other connected organizations that may lack HIPPA compliant systems or their staff may just not be trained to handle such sensitive information securely.

Digital information transmission exposes the organization to several security risks. While hosted solutions may be able to provide some level of security, the provider is not relieved of their responsibility towards safeguarding and protecting client information. EHR interoperability is definitely necessary in developing ACOs. However the focus should not just be on the technology itself, but on developing the right environment for it to flourish. Embedding a culture of responsibility within the healthcare community is the first step for enabling a successful transition towards Accountable Care Organizations.

 

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5 Responses to EMR Interoperability and Accountable Care Organizations

  1. charlie ward says:

    First of all thank you for the article! I found it while searching for physical therapy documentation software. I think that EMR technology is the wave of the future in a technological society. It stream lines everything and makes everything so much easier. It also allows patients to check their records which I think is great. While their may be some risks, I think overall its worth it. Thanks again for the read!

  2. Ashok Jain says:

    Thanks for the share its quite informative. Big provider has all resources trained people to hold sensitive patient info but small players and providers in rural areas do not have so much of infrastructure or trained people for sensitive EMR info.

    I think government should provide infrastructure and provide training on EMR for small provider especially in rural areas.

    • curemd says:

      That’s a relevant point, Ashok.

      Information security is essential regardless of practice size. With the government currently focused on EMR adoption across the nation, bodies likes regional extension centers will certainly have to expand their role and provide training on the various risks associated with information storage and sharing.

  3. Dr. James Watson says:

    This is amazing, I am glad you are writing such valuable information.

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